Miscellanea

An extract from the Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite

At the beginning of the Mass, after the prayers at the foot of the altar, the priest says:

“Almighty God unto whom all hearts be open, all desires known and from whom no secrets are hid: Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of thy Holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love thee, and worthily magnify thy Holy Name: through Christ our Lord. Amen.”


Visits by Cardinal Nichols and Ambassador Joao de Vallera to the central church of the Ordinariate

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Friends’ Chairman visits the Darlington Ordinariate Group

The Chairman of the Friends of the Ordinariate, Nicolas Ollivant, visited the Darlington Ordinariate Group, based at St Osmund’s Church, Gainford, on the weekend of 2nd/3rd May. He was the guest of Fr Ian Grieves for dinner on Saturday evening, along with Keith Brown, Director of Music at Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street, London (and Director of Music at the John Lyon School, Harrow London). It was an evening of fine Northern hospitality!

On Sunday morning, Nicolas attended the 11.30am Solemn Mass at St Osmund’s Church. Keith Brown was the organist on this occasion and one of the Honorary Vice Presidents of the Friends was also present, Sir Josslyn Gore-Booth. The setting of the Mass (Novus Ordo in English) was Charles Stanford’s Communion Service in C&F sung by the church’s excellent choir.  The anthem was Stanford’s Te Deum in B flat. Fr Grieves preached the homily. Nicolas then joined members of the parish for coffee in the parish room after Mass. He said: “I was very happy to meet so many members of the congregation and was very pleased to have been greeted so warmly. It is encouraging to meet such a flourishing Ordinariate group!”

At Pentecost (Whit Sunday) the Ordinary, Mgr Keith Newton, will be visiting Gainford to celebrate Mass at the church and to preach the homily.

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The Arundel Ballad

WalsinghamAbbeyRemainsThis version of the famous ballad that laments the destruction of the Shrine at Walsingham is from H M Gillett’s Walsingham. The manuscript is housed in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, in the Arundel collection. As we contemplate the mystery of the Lord’s Passion, Death and Resurrection during this Sacred Triduum, we also rejoice to think that Walsingham, which seemed lost when these lines were first written, is now very much a living place of pilgrimage and grace once more!


In the wrackes of Walsingam
Whom should I chuse
But the Queene of Walsingam
To be guide to my muse?

Then, thou Prince of Walsingam
Graunt me to frame
Bitter plaintes to rewe thy wronge
Bitter wo for thy name.

Bitter was it, oh to see
The sely sheepe
Murdred by the raveninge wolves
While the sheepharde did sleep.

Bitter was it, oh, to viewe
The sacred vyne
Whiles the gardiners plaied all close
Rooted up by the swine.

Bitter, bitter oh to behoulde
The grasse to growe
Where the walles of Walsingam
So stately did shewe.

Such were the worth of Walsingam
While she did stand
Such are the wrackes as now do shewe
Of that (so) holy lande.

Levell, levell with the ground
The Towres doe lye
Which with their golden, glitt’ring tops
Pearsed oute to the skye.

Where weare gates noe gates are nowe,
The waies unknowen,
Where the presse of freares did passe
While her fame far was blowen.

Oules do scrike where the sweetest himnes
Lately wear songe,
Toades and serpents hold their dennes
Where the palmers did throng.

Weep, weep O Walsingam,
Whose dayes are nightes,
Blessings turned to blasphemies,
Holy deedes to dispites.

Sinne is where our Ladye sate,
Heaven turned is to helle;
Sathan sitte where our Lord did swaye,
Walsingam, oh, farewell!

 


 

Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter (Spring/Summer 2015)

To read the latest Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter, please click on the image and / or link below.

The Spring/Summer 2015 edition contains messages from our President, Mgr Keith Newton, and Chairman, Nicolas Ollivant, as well as a letter to our Chairman from Benedict XVI, and articles on the mission of Blessed Dominic Barberi, the architecture of the Ordinariate’s central church, and the Ordinariate’s hermit, Br David Butler. The issue also contains homilies by Fr Michael Lang CongOrat, parish priest of the London Oratory, and Mgr Harry Entwistle, the Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross (Australia), and the first part of a talk on Anglicanorum Coetibus by Mgr Mark Langham, the current Catholic Chaplain at Cambridge University and a former Secretary for Anglican and Methodist Dialogues at the Pontifical Council for Christian Unity. Also in this edition: Friends’ news, events, and dates for your diary…

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Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter Spring/Summer 2015 (pdf) — Please note it may take a few minutes for the file to download. Thank you.)

 

Performance to Inaugurate the Anglo-Portuguese Ensemble
Portuguese Ambassador to Visit Warwick Street

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On Thursday 29 January 2015 at 7.00pm the debut performance by the Anglo-Portuguese Ensemble will occur at the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street – the home of the Central London Group of the Ordinariate of our Lady of Walsingham.

This musical initiative is occurring as a result of the very successful Portuguese National Day celebration and Mass which the church hosted in June 2014. This event marked the first occasion on which, officially, a Portuguese Ambassador had entered in modern times what had originally been the chapel of the former Portuguese Embassy which was located in Golden Square over 250 years ago.

Subsequent to this occasion, it was agreed between the church and the embassy that a musical foundation or legacy should be established and should be based at Warwick Street in order to help further the careers of young, aspiring Portuguese and English music students studying at prestigious institutions such as the Royal Academy, Royal College, Guildhall School and so forth.

The event on 29 January, will in essence, be the launch of a series of concerts in the future, all of which will be performed by people who will, more than likely, become ‘the’ classical music professionals in the future. On this occasion the group will consist of Portuguese and British string players.

Apart from the ties that bind the Warwick Street Church with the Portuguese Embassy, Portugal and England maintain the longest political alliance in the West, dating back to 1386. We are hoping that the recognition of this historical fact together with the connections to Warwick Street will lead to other developments in the arts field in the future.

The event on 29 January will be in the presence of the Portuguese Ambassador, His Excellency Joao de Vallera. The performance will feature work by the contemporary Portuguese composer, Braga Santos, Tchaikovsky’s ‘Serenade for Strings’ and ‘Fantasia Upon One Note’ by Purcell.

Admission to this inaugural performance will be free, but a retiring collection will be taken and proceeds will be divided between the young musicians performing on the evening and the Warwick Street Church, members of which are currently raising funds to purchase a concert-standard piano in order to host a wider variety of performers and performances.

We extend a warm welcome to you to attend this performance and indeed, further concerts in the future.

For further information please contact:
Mrs. Diana Morphew by email: diana.morphew@gmail.com or phone: 0208 341 9127

Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street, Soho, W1B5LZ (nearest tube: Piccadilly)

 


 

Anglican Use Society

A link to the Anglican Use Society (please click on the image).

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Towards Advent 2014

The popular Towards Advent Festival of Catholic Culture will take place in Westminster Cathedral Hall on Saturday 22 November. Doors open at 10.00am and the event will then be officially opened by Mgr Keith Newton, Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, at 10.30am. For the first time, the Friends of the Ordinariate will have a stall at the Festival. If you’re in central London on 22 November, please come along and say hello.

For more details about the day please see the poster below or visit the Towards Advent website.

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Darlington Ordinariate Group

More events organised for the coming weeks and months by the Darlington Ordinariate group.

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Advent Talks at the Church of the Most Precious Blood, Borough (London SE1)

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Darlington Ordinariate Group – Events

Here are the Darlington Ordinariate Group’s events for All Saints and Christmas. The group meets in St Osmund’s Church, Gainford.

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Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter (Autumn 2014)

To read the latest Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter, please click on the image and / or link below.

The Autumn 2014 edition of the Newsletter contains messages from our Honorary President, Mgr Keith Newton, and Chairman, Nicolas Ollivant. It also contains interesting news items and articles, including an introduction to the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross by Mgr Harry Entwistle, an article on the ‘Third Spring’ by Michael Hodges, a report on a Friends’ appeal in the South of France, an Ordinariate priest’s journey of faith, as well as two personal reflections on the Ordinariate by supporters of the Friends.

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Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter (Autumn 2014)

Opinions expressed in the Newsletter do not necessarily reflect those of the Friends, unless explicitly stated otherwise.


Friends of the Ordinariate October e-bulletin

Welcome to the October 2014 e-bulletin of the Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham.

As our friends and supporters, we wish to keep you informed of the latest Friends’ news, updates and future events. If you wish to unsubscribe from this bulletin, please send the word ‘Unsubscribe’ in a reply to this email.

If you are aware of anyone who would like to be included on our mailing list, please ask them to email me (Dylan) – using either this email or admin@friendsoftheordinariate.org.uk – Thank you.

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Friends’ Autumn Newsletter

The Friends of the Ordinariate Autumn 2014 Newsletter is now available to download and read online. To download the pdf version of the Newsletter, please follow this link: Newsletter.

The Autumn Newsletter contains messages from our Honorary President, Mgr Keith Newton, and Chairman, Nicolas Ollivant. It also contains interesting news items and articles, including an introduction to the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross by Msgr Harry Entwistle, an article on the ‘Third Spring’ by Michael Hodges, a report on a Friends’ appeal in the South of France, an Ordinariate priest’s journey of faith, as well as two personal reflections on the Ordinariate by supporters of the Friends.

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Visit to St Chad’s Cathedral, Birmingham

During a successful Friends of the Ordinariate appeal at St Chad’s Cathedral, Birmingham on 4/5th October, Mgr Keith Newton described the Ordinariate as a “model” and “prototype” of Christian unity.

Mgr Newton and the Friends had been invited to visit the Cathedral by Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham and the Cathedral Dean, Canon Gerry Breen.

We are very grateful to Archbishop Longley and Canon Breen, as well as the Archbishop’s private secretary, Fr Dominic Cosslett, and the staff and volunteers at Archbishop’s House and the Cathedral for their warm welcome and hospitality. We are also grateful to the parishioners of St Chad’s who donated to the Friends through a second collection.

More on this story here: Visit to St Chad’s

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Feast of Blessed John Henry Newman

The Friends of Our Lady of Walsingham organised a Solemn Mass in the Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite for the feast of Blessed John Henry Newman on Thursday 9 October. This Mass will be was similar to the one offered last year, at which the Ordinariate Use was officially introduced. The Mass was celebrated by Mgr Keith Newton in the Ordinariate’s central church, Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory’s, Warwick Street (London W1). The guest preacher was Fr Michael Lang, Parish Priest of the London Oratory. During his sermon, Fr Lang, who serves on the Holy See’s interdicasterial commission ‘Anglicanae Traditiones’, which prepares liturgical texts for use in the personal ordinariates, reflected on the ‘call to universal holiness’ in the life and work of Blessed John Henry Newman. For more on this story, please see here: Annual Newman Mass.

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Friends of the Ordinariate Cathedral Appeals

St John’s Cathedral, Norwich: 25/26th October

On the weekend of 25/26th October, Mgr Keith Newton will visit St John’s Catholic Cathedral, Norwich as part of a wider appeal by the Friends of the Ordinariate. During his stay in Norwich, Mgr Newton will preach at all the Sunday Masses and literature about the Ordinariate and the Friends will be distributed. If you happen to be in Norwich that weekend, please come and introduce yourself to a one of the Friends.

The Friends will also hold an appeal at St George’s Cathedral, Southwark, on 31st January / 1st February 2015. Again, Mgr Newton is expected to preach at all Masses in during that weekend – the last two days of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity.

This weekend! 

As well as visits to cathedrals, Mgr Newton will be visiting The Church of the Transfiguration (Kensal Rise, London) on 18/19 October – this coming weekend. Again, he will preach at all Masses in Kensal Rise and will be accompanied by a member of the Friends’ team.

Other appeal visits will also take place throughout the coming months, involving other members of the Ordinariate clergy.

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Towards Advent: 22 November

The Friends of the Ordinariate will have a stall at this year’s Towards Advent Festival of Catholic Culture in Westminster Cathedral Hall. The event will take place on Saturday 22 November. If you are planning on attending any part of that day, please know that you are most welcome to come and visit our stall!

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Future events

Please mark these following dates in your diary!

8 January 2015: The annual Friends of the Ordinariate Epiphany Carol Service at Warwick Street, with the Schola Cantorum of the Cardinal Vaughan Merorial School and guest readers. 6.30pm.

8 February 2015: Evensong and Benediction in the presence of the three Ordinaries at Warwick Street, organised by the Friends.

12 February 2015: Mass celebrated by HE Cardinal Vincent Nichols in the presence of the three Ordinaries at Westminster Cathedral, supported by the Friends.

More details to follow.

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 Friends’ social media

Our Facebook page continues to grow, and is a good way of keeping up to date with news of the activities of the Friends of the Ordinariate. If you are on Facebook and are yet to ‘like’ our page, please visit it here.

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Please mention us to your friends

If you know of anyone who would like to donate to or support the Friends of the Ordinariate or who might wish to receive this bulletin, please pass on my contact details to them. I would be most happy to hear from them.

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Grant applications

To make an application for a grant from the Friends of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, please provide a detailed proposal and write to: The Chairman and Trustees, The Friends of the Ordinariate, 24 Golden Square, London W1F 9JR. The Friends of the Ordinariate exists to provide financial and practical support for the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham and to raise awareness of the Ordinariate among the wider Catholic community.

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The Friends of the Ordinariate would like to thank you for your continued support and generosity. Your donations help us to help the Ordinariate and also provide us with the means of being able to make the mission of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham more widely known and understood throughout the wider Catholic Church. By visiting the ‘Donate’ page on our website, you will find the many ways you or your friends can support our work.

With my very best wishes,

Dylan Parry


 

“Finally Hopkins and Herbert can share a pew”

The following article was first published in the Catholic Herald in January 2013. It is reproduced here by kind permission of the editor and the author.

by Edmund Matyjaszek 

The news that one of the loveliest London churches, Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory in Warwick Street, is to be given over for use by the ordinariate is possibly the best second birthday present imaginable for this new part of the Church in England. There is also poetry in the fact that the ordinariate,­ still little known and even less understood,­ is that of Our Lady of Walsingham. For a church bearing the title of Our Lady’s great feast, the Assumption, and also that of the Pope who sent St Augustine in the sixth century as the ‘apostle to the English’, to house the ordinariate, and in London too, can hardly be other than a providential sign for its mission to act ‘as a bridge between the Anglican Communion and the Apostolic See of Rome, reconciling all the spiritual children of St Augustine of Canterbury’.

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George Herbert

The Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham under the patronage of Blessed John Henry Newman, to give it its full title, was set up on January 15 2011, following the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum Coetibus of November 2009, to meet the requests of ‘Anglican faithful who desire to enter into the full communion of the Catholic Church in a corporate manner’. That is what the ordinariate was set up to do. In so doing I believe it will change the face of English Christianity forever­ and I say English advisedly­ in both a national, cultural and linguistic way. It signals the end of the English Reformation, and the beginning of institutional re-union. It is the fruit of the ecumenical prayer of the last few decades. It is a revolutionary step that fully justifies the use of that often politically misused word ‘diversity’. It shatters the naïve idea of a monolithic Church.

It is only possible as a result of the Second Vatican Council whose 50th anniversary we honour in this Year of Faith. Yet it reaches back into the past to re-connect with our deepest elements of national identity and refresh them in a context of living truth, accepting­ this is the unique aspect, inconceivable were it not for the Vatican Council’s approach to ecumenism,­ that other ecclesial bodies possess ‘elements of sanctification and truth … found outside the [Catholic] Church’s visible confines’.

As Scripture says, God has no favourites, ‘but anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him’. But a corporate means of embodying that? That is new. With the acceptance of ‘elements of sanctification and truth’ comes an extraordinary recognition that this extends not just to the ‘liturgical, spiritual and pastoral traditions of the Anglican communion as a precious gift nourishing the faith of members of the ordinariate and as a treasure to be shared’, but also to, for instance, the synodal traditions of the Anglican Church.

There is to be a governing council under the Ordinary, Mgr Keith Newton, who will exercise ‘personal authority’. The ordinariate sits alongside and within the diocesan structure and can have parishes,­ that is groups of the faithful,­ but they will be personal not territorial. (In the age of online communities this idea of personal groupings is perfectly understandable.) But the priests on the general council can vote on who is to be on the terna, that is, the list of three candidates to be the Ordinary. This is more than just a nod in the direction of synodal government. It is an acceptance of the validity of that aspect of the Anglican Church.

The ordinariate is still small, of course. There is a personal register which has more than 1,220 souls, and there are 81 priests, one deacon and now a community of nuns as well. It is growing.

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins

What does this all mean in practice? To attend an ordinariate Mass is to hear a Catholic liturgy that has parts of Cranmer’s Book of Common Prayer. It is to hold in one’s hands the English Hymnal first edited by Ralph Vaughan Williams, with hymns by St Anselm, George Herbert, William Cowper, Charles Wesley and Christina Rossetti. It is to hear the words of the Revised Standard Version, which go back to Tyndale’s first translation, burnt and then honoured by the authorities, and later borrowed from by every Bible translation since. It is to heal the divisions of centuries by hearing the words framed by both persecutor and punished, but now conjoined in an ecclesial form common to both. It is to pray for our monarch and her family without a tremor of diffidence or unfamiliarity. It is to have George Herbert and Gerard Manley Hopkins sitting in the same pew, and perhaps even to see, across the centuries, Cranmer and Challoner finally embrace.

It is to live in a new house of prayer – a very English one at that. It is to repossess the soul of our culture by means of its quintessential agent: the English language. It is to recover that ‘native hue’, which the poet Tom Paulin recently called ‘the concealed heart of the English identity’. It is, after so many long centuries of Christian division, to come home to ourselves.

Above all, it is to see the land that belongs to Our Lady begin to be fully hers again, gifted by Richard II in a royal act commemorated in the Wilton Diptych: a royal decree, note, that has never been retracted or denied, that is, the dedication of England in the 1380s as the Dowry of Mary confirmed by his Archbishop of Canterbury in 1399: ‘But we, as the humble servants of her inheritance, and liegemen of her especial dower, as we are approved by common parlance, ought to excel all others in the favour of our praises and devotions to her.’ It is the ordinariate being that of Our Lady of Walsingham that is the key to its nature and even more its mission. Walsingham is where Our Lady asked for a ‘memorial to her great joy’, a ‘newe Nazareth’, to be built. This in Walsingham led to England itself being understood as her dowry or domain, her ‘holy land’, a place set apart for her use alone. No other nation on earth claims anything like this. But the shrine itself, suppressed in 1538, only found its restoration through the joint work in the 19th and early 20th centuries of Anglicans and Catholics.

Is it not appropriate that this great step to the corporate re-union of Christianity should be in the land and under the mantle of she who bore the undivided flesh of God’s own Son; and whose shrine has found new life after centuries of scorn and denial in the very joining of the two great traditions of English Christianity, sundered at the Reformation but now brought back together in one Church?

Go to an ordinariate Mass. Take up the English Hymnal. Sing God’s praises from it. Stand as a descendant of the recusants, as an inheritor of the immigrant traditions of exile, or stand as an Englishman or Englishwoman, confident in the established faith of your forefathers. We are all one now. We have a new national Church emerging. Rooted in history, accepting fully the divisions of the past, but bringing them under the healing mantle of she whose land this always was and is so still.


 

Friends of the Ordinariate: August e-bulletin

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Welcome to the August 2014 e-bulletin of the Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham.

As our friends and supporters, we wish to keep you informed of the latest Friends’ news, updates and future events. If you are aware of anyone who would like to be included on our mailing list, please  email Dylan at admin@friendsoftheordinariate.org.uk – Thank you.

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Friends’ Appeal at St John’s Cathedral, Portsmouth

On the weekend of the 26/27th July, Mgr Keith Newton visited St John’s Cathedral, Portsmouth, as part of a wider Friends of the Ordinariate appeal. During his visit, Mgr Newton preached at all the Sunday Masses. He was joined during the weekend by Dylan Parry and Richard Windsor from the Friends of the Ordinariate. The visit was a great success and we are very grateful to the Rt Revd Philip Egan, Bishop of Portsmouth, and Canon Dominic Golding, Dean of the Cathedral, for their kind welcome and generous hospitality. We are also most grateful to the parishioners of St John’s Cathedral, who raised nearly £600 for the Friends of the Ordinariate.

A report on the weekend is available on the Ordinariate website. Photos from the weekend are available on the Friends’ Flickr page.

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An Ordinariate visit to the French Riviera

On behalf of the Friends, Fr Scott Anderson (Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham) visited Grimaud, a town on the
French Riviera, over the weekend of 16/17th August. He had been kindly invited by Canon Peter Watts, the parish priest of Grimaud and a supporter of the Personal Ordinariate. We are very grateful to Canon Watts for allowing the Friends to make an appeal in his parish and to Fr Anderson for travelling to the South of France on our behalf. We are also very grateful to the parishioners and worshippers at Canon Watts’ church – a considerable sum was raised for the Friends during the appeal. More on this story will appear in the next edition of the Friends’ Newsletter.

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Friends of the Ordinariate Cathedral Appeals

In the coming weeks and months, it is hoped that Mgr Keith Newton will visit several cathedrals on behalf of the Friends of the Ordinariate. Please come along and support these appeals. Here are the next two dates:

4/5 October: St Chad’s Cathedral, Birmingham
25/26 October: St John’s Cathedral, Norwich

Mgr Newton will also be visiting St George’s Cathedral, Southwark, in early 2015.

As well as visits to cathedrals, Mgr Newton will be visiting The Church of the Transfiguration (Kensal Rise, London) on 18/19 October. Due to unforeseen circumstances, the visit to Blackfen has been postponed until next year.  Other appeal visits will also take place throughout the coming months, involving other members of the Ordinariate clergy.

These visits are organised by the Friends of the Ordinariate and form part of our mission to raise awareness of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham within the wider Catholic community. They also provide a fundraising opportunity for the Friends, and we are grateful to all the bishops and priests who have invited us to visit their churches. During these events, many diocesan Catholics are introduced to the Ordinariate for the first time, with a substantial number showing great interest in this prophetic and important ecumenical part of the universal Church.

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Called to be One: 6 September

The Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham are actively supporting the ‘Called to be One’ exploration day organised by the Ordinariate for Saturday 6 September. This country-wide event is designed for people who are not currently members of the Ordinariate but who are interested to learn more about it. The Friends of the Ordinariate recently made a grant towards the costs of promoting this event. For more details of ‘Called to be One’, please visit the Ordinariate website. A page on the website is dedicated to details of local events up and down the country.

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Ordinariate Festival: 19-21 September

The largest gathering of clergy and faithful from more than 40 Ordinariate groups across the country will be in London for an Ordinariate Festival weekend from 19-21 September. The celebrations will begin on the evening of Friday 19 September with a reception for members of the Ordinariate and friends, by kind invitation of the Ordinary, Mgr Newton. The journalist and broadcaster, Dr William Oddie will be the guest speaker. On the following day, Saturday 20 September, an all-day conference will be held at Westminster Cathedral Hall, during which both the Ordinary and HE Cardinal Vincent Nicholas will speak. Mass will be offered in the Cathedral at 12.30pm. On that evening, the Ladies Ordinariate Group (LOGS) will hold a special reception at the Church of the Precious Blood, Borough. On Sunday 21 September, all those gathered for the Festival are invited to attend Solemn Mass according to the Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite at the Ordinariate’s central church, Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory’s, Warwick Street – during which a new setting of the Mass, composed by the parish priest, Fr Mark Elliott Smith, will be performed. For more information on this Festival weekend, please email: festival@ordinariate.org.uk or visit the Ordinariate website.

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Future Liturgical Events

The Friends of the Ordinariate are supporting several future liturgical and social events organised by the Personal Ordinariate, including a Mass to mark the feast of Blessed John Henry Newman in October and the visit of the Ordinaries from Australia and the USA in February 2015. As part of this visit, events are being organised both at the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory in Warwick Street, London W1, and at Westminster Cathedral. We will keep you informed about these future events as they are being organised.

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Towards Advent: 22 November

The Friends of the Ordinariate will have a stall at this year’s Towards Advent Festival of Catholic Culture in Westminster Cathedral Hall. Our stall will be shared with the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. The event will take place on Saturday 22 November. If you are planning on attending any part of that day, please know that you are most welcome to come and visit our stall!

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Newsletter – out in October

The next Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter will be published in October. The deadline for submission of notices or articles is 25 September. If you would like to highlight an event or submit a contribution, please contact me on this email prior to this date. Thank you.

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Friends’ social media

Our Facebook page continues to grow, and is a good way of keeping up to date with news of the activities of the Friends of the Ordinariate. If you are on Facebook and are yet to ‘like’ our page, please visit it here.

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Mention us to your friends and family

If you know of anyone who would like to donate to or support the Friends of the Ordinariate or who might wish to receive this bulletin, please pass on my contact details to them. I would be most happy to hear from them.

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Thank you!

We would like to thank all those who have donated to the Friends using the PayPal facility on the website (details below). The Chairman will soon be contacting many of you individually to express his gratitude on behalf of the Friends of the Ordinariate.

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Grant applications

To make an application for a grant from the Friends of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, please provide a detailed proposal and write to: The Chairman and Trustees, The Friends of the Ordinariate, 24 Golden Square, London W1F 9JR. The Friends of the Ordinariate exists to provide financial and practical support for the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham and to raise awareness of the Ordinariate among the wider Catholic community.

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The Friends of the Ordinariate would like to thank you for your continued support and generosity. Your donations help us to help the Ordinariate and also provide us with the means of being able to make the mission of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham more widely known and understood throughout the wider Catholic Church. By visiting the ‘Donate’ page on our website, you will find the many ways you or your friends can support our work.

 


 

Dates for your Diary

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Here are some dates of events of interest that will take place during the next few months in 2014:

17 August: Feast of Title at Warwick Street (see poster below.)

6 September: “Called to be One” exploration day (See the poster on the Ordinariate website for details of events near you.)

19-21 September: Ordinariate Festival, which will include an Ordinariate Day at Westminster Cathedral, with HE Cardinal Vincent Nichols. (See here for more details.)

27 September: Feast of Our Lady of Walsingham at St Agatha’s Church, Portsmouth, with a Solemn High Mass and Procession at 11.00am; Sparrow Mass by Mozart with orchestral accompaniment. (See St Agatha’s website for more.)

4-5 October: Mgr Keith Newton will visit St Chad’s Cathedral, Birmingham, during a Friends of the Ordinariate appeal. He will be greeted by Archbishop Bernard Longley during the Solemn Mass on Sunday.

9 October: Feast of Blessed John Henry Newman at Warwick Street

18-19 October: Mgr Keith Newton will visit the Church of the Transfiguration, Kensal Rise, during a Friends of the Ordinariate appeal.

25-26 October: Mgr Keith Newton will be at St John’s Cathedral, Norwich, for a Friends of the Ordinariate appeal.

22 November: The Friends of the Ordinariate and the Ordinariate will have a stall at the “Towards Advent” festival of Catholic culture at Westminster Cathedral.

If you you would like an Ordinariate event to be highlighted by the Friends of the Ordinariate, please email admin@friendsoftheordinariate.org.uk with details.


 

Feast of Title at Warwick Street, 17 August 2014

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Dates from our Recusant Past

Below are listed some dates in relation to the Penal Laws and Relief Acts that dealt with the rights of Catholics in England and Wales from the Reformation until the early part of the nineteenth century. These dates are taken from The Recusant Historian’s Handbook by J A Hilton (see HERE). We thought readers of this page would be interested in the information contained in this list.

Penal Laws and Relief Acts

1559, Act of Supremacy: Monarch supreme governor of Church of England, clergy to take oath of supremacy on pain of deprivation.

1559, Act of Uniformity: imposed Book of Common Prayer, one shilling fine for failure to attend church on Sunday.

1563, forbidden to defend papal supremacy on pain of Praemunire (forfeiture of property).

1571, treason to call monarch heretic or schismatic, treason to introduce papal bulls.

1581, treason to convert or to be converted to Catholicism, fine of £20 per month for recusancy.

1585, treason for Jesuits or seminary priests to enter the country.

1587, suspected recusant who failed to appear for trial incurred guilt.

1593, recusants restricted to within five miles of their homes.

1605, convicted recusants to receive Anglican communion once per annum on pain of fine and eventual forfeiture of property.

1605, recusants barred from office and professions.

1678, recusants barred from parliament.

1692, recusants incur double land tax.

1699, recusants barred from purchasing or inheriting land.

1778, Relief Act: Catholics permitted to own land.

1791, Relief Act: Catholic clergy permitted to exercise ministry.

1829, Emancipation Act: Catholics permitted to hold office and to sit in parliament.


 

In the following article The Revd Mgr John Broadhurst, Assistant to the Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham and the former Anglican Bishop of Fulham and former Chairman of Forward in Faith, responds to a recent article published in the Forward in Faith publication New Directions.

Forward in Faith?

By Mgr John Broadhurst

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Mgr John Broadhurst at a recent Friends of the Ordinariate event at the Apostolic Nunciature.

When I resigned as founding Chairman of Forward in Faith it was an organisation which had recently resolved to support both the Society [an ecclesial body, under the patronage of St Wilfrid and St Hilda] and the Ordinariate. This was with near unanimity at a National Assembly. I was happy to remain a member. Though I had concern and support for those I had led for twenty years and remained in the Church of England, I resolved I would never comment on any internal discussion in the Church of England or the organisation. The January Edition of New Directions challenged my intentions. I drafted a response and then decided to leave it unsaid. This month’s issue forces me to comment. Within a day of its publication I received many complaints from members of FiF who were also in the Ordinariate.

Forward in Faith’s motto was ‘A vision of Unity and Truth’. The January article called ‘A Vision Glorious’ written by the new director seeks to rewrite history at the expense of both as it promotes the Society.

What had challenged me was the statement  “Many of the other Catholic Bishops stood back from Forward in Faith, which was seen to some extent as the domain of the then Bishop of Fulham and the PEV’s, perhaps because it seemed too extreme.” This is to completely misunderstand our history.

The problem for the ‘catholic’ Bishops has always been that they are Bishops from the catholic movement, and not bishops of the catholic movement. They have been loved and valued by Anglo-Catholics but over the years I have often heard their assertion that people need to understand that they are Bishops of the whole Church of England. A consequence is that they inevitably stand back from all catholic organisations. This was not just Forward in Faith, but the Church Union and may other societies. Much more serious for the whole movement was their absence from the Catholic Group in Synod. In my 24 years in Synod the only bishop to regularly attend the group was Noel Jones. Interestingly, he was also the only one to go round the country as we set up FiF. The only Bishops for the catholic movement were the PEV’s. The Catholic Movement was from the beginning led by priests and laity. Nothing has changed, and when I was appointed Bishop of Fulham I offered my resignation because of the tension between episcopal office and a radical organisation. This was declined.

That said, the decision to service and support the Society at great expense was taken in my time as Chairman, and all of the catholic bishops have been on the platform at national assemblies over the years. The Society has however got some problems. Firstly, it is not really a society but a programme – its members have no say in its ordinance. Furthermore, most of those who founded it only very recently are already all out of active ministry. Going back 30 years our consistent position had been our inability to accept women priests and Bishops for theological and ecclesial reasons. Our stance was always that a Code of Practice would not do. ‘Please don’t make us work with them seems misogyny rather than theology!’

This month’s article by the Director [see below for link] is a critique of the Ordinariate. It contains several questionable comments. He starts with the Ordinariate Chrism Mass. Whatever he might think, this is the Ordinary’s Chrism Mass. He is not a bishop because Rome decided it could not at this time ordain married Bishops. However, Keith Newton has something he did not have as a PEV – jurisdiction. The ordinary would normally be a bishop and no doubt his successor will be. Mgr Newton could have asked any Bishop to celebrate for him. The Nuncio was asked because he has been a real friend and not because he was the Pope’s personal representative. It is worth pointing out that only one Society Bishop has Jurisdiction. ‘Ecclesiological problems’ work both ways.

The second issue is our September 6th outreach day ‘Called to be One’. He suggests an implicit proselytism. I was party to the planning of this event and can assure him the truth is the reverse. We do get enquiries and questions from many laypeople. This event can be generally advertised and not specifically targeted. We wanted an event that would not cause us, or others, any problems. He ends his comments by asking to be told if any Forward in Faith member feels targeted. Perhaps he would also like a list of those actively discouraged from joining the Ordinariate by some still in the CofE? When the Ordinariate began we were told that there would be dialogue between us and those remaining. In spite of queries from our side this has not happened.

I notice that recently the Cover of New Directions has the sub-title ‘supporting the Society…’. Have the Officers unilaterally changed the democratically agreed stance of Forward in Faith? I deeply regret that this debate is in public but I did not publish the issue.

I left a large and enthusiastic organisation with a large and varied team of activists. It is worth reminding ourselves that FiF raised and spent over £6 milllion and even now survives with bequests from its ‘extreme’ days. I remain proud of our organisation and all it achieved and wish it well.

To read the Director’s article mentioned in this piece, please see HERE (June edition, p 9).

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Friends of the Ordinariate June e-Bulletin

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 Welcome to the June 2014 e-bulletin of the Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham.

As our friends and supporters, we wish to keep you informed of the latest Friends’ news, updates and future events. If you or any others you may be aware of would like to be included on our mailing list, please ask them to email me (Dylan) at dylanparry@friendsoftheordinariate.org.uk  — Thank you.


Friends’ Summer Reception at the Apostolic Nunciature

 On Tuesday 10 June, the Friends of the Ordinariate held a fundraising Summer Reception at the Apostolic Nunciature. During the event, the Apostolic Nuncio, Archbishop Antonio Mennini, pledged his continued support for the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. In his address, Mgr Keith Newton spoke of the Ordinariate as “profoundly ecumenical” and said that “Ecumenists should be very excited about the Ordinariate”. Among the guests present was Mother Winsome, the Superior of the newly created Ordinariate monastery of the Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary. So far, around £8,000 has been raised for the work of the Friends as a result of the Summer Reception.

To read more about this event, please see HERE and HERE.

For photos of the event, please see HERE.


Portuguese Ambassador visits Warwick Street

On Sunday 15 June, the Portuguese Ambassador to the United Kingdom, His Excellency João de Vallera, attended the 10.30am Solemn Mass at the Ordinariate’s central church in Warwick Street, Soho. The Mass was followed by a reception and had been arranged as part of efforts to restore the church’s historic links with Portugal.

Also present at the Mass and reception was His Most Eminent Highness Fra’ Matthew Festing, Prince and Grand Master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. Fra’ Festing is also an Honorary Vice President of the Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. After the Mass, he met with the current Chairman of the Friends, Nicolas Ollivant, as well as the former Chairman, Peter Sefton Williams.

For more on this event, please see the Ordinariate website HERE.

For photos of the event, please see HERE.


Friends of the Ordinariate Appeals
Mgr Keith Newton’s scheduled visits to Cathedrals

Following on from last month’s bulletin, we are now able to confirm that the Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, Mgr Keith Newton, will be preaching at all Masses at the following cathedrals on behalf of the Friends of the Ordinariate during the coming months. Please come along and support these appeals.

5/6 July: Shrewsbury Cathedral
26/27 July: Portsmouth Cathedral
4/5 October: St Chad’s Cathedral, Birmingham
25/26 October: St John’s Cathedral, Norwich

Mgr Newton will also be visiting The Church of the Transfiguration (Kensal Rise, London) on 18/19 October. All these visits are organised by the Friends of the Ordinariate and form part of our mission to raise awareness of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham within the wider Catholic community. They also provide a fundraising opportunity for the Friends, and we are grateful to all the bishops and priests who have invited us to visit their churches.


Towards Advent

The Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham will have a stall at the popular Towards Advent Festival of Catholic Culture in November. More on this nearer the time.


Friends’ social media

Our Facebook page continues to grow, and is a good way of keeping up to date with news of the activities of the Friends of the Ordinariate. If you are on Facebook and are yet to ‘like’ our page, please visit it HERE.


Mention us to your friends

If you know of anyone who would like to donate to or support the Friends of the Ordinariate or who might wish to receive this bulletin, please pass on my contact details to them. I would be most happy to hear from them.


Corpus Christi Procession

The central London parishes of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, and St James’s, Spanish Place, will, for the first time, hold an outdoor Corpus Christi procession between the two churches this Sunday, 22 June. The Blessed Sacrament procession will commence at 5.15pm inside the Jesuit Church, Farm Street, and walk via Berkeley Square, Grosvenor Square, Duke Street and Manchester Square concluding with Benediction at St James’s Church, Spanish Place. Although not directly related to the Friends of the Ordinariate, this event has been part organised by one of our Trustees, and all recipients of this bulletin are encouraged to attend this special witness to the Real Presence of Our Blessed Lord in the Eucharist.


Thank you for your continued support and generosity. Your donations help us to help the Ordinariate and also provide us with the means of being able to make the mission of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham more widely known and understood throughout the wider Catholic Church. By visiting the ‘Donate’ page on our website, you will find the many ways you or your friends can support our work.

May you enjoy the coming Solemnities of Corpus Christi and the Sacred Heart and have a very pleasant rest of June and early July. 

Dylan – Friends of the Ordinariate

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The Eastertide / Summer edition of the Friends’ Newsletter

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This edition contains exciting and interesting articles by friends and supporters of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, including features and pieces by: Colin Mawby KSG, Joanna Bogle DSG, Fr Timothy Finigan, Edmund Matyjaszek, Anthony Delarue, and Fr Daniel Lloyd. It also contains special messages from the Ordinary, and President of the Friends, Mgr Keith Newton, and the Chairman of the Friends of the Ordinariate, Nicolas Ollivant, as well as news and reports about the Friends and a feature on the Darlington Ordinariate.

To read the Newsletter, please click on the image above or the link below.

Friends of the Ordinariate Newsletter (Eastertide / Summer 2014) pdf

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The Sacred Paschal Triduum and Easter

The poster below shows times of Masses and Services scheduled to be held at the Ordinariate’s Central Church, Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory’s, Warwick Street, over the Sacred Triduum and on Easter Sunday. For details about other Ordinariate Holy Week and Easter services, please see the Ordinariate website.

 

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Friends’ Visit to the Darlington Ordinariate Group

d20The Darlington Ordinariate, headed by Fr Ian Grieves, invited Dylan Parry of the Friends of the Ordinariate to visit their group in Gainford over the weekend of 5/6 April.

The Darlington Ordinariate is an extremely successful and very welcoming group, with about 70 to 80 members, most of whom were former members of St James’s Anglican church in Darlington.

After his visit Dylan said: “Fr Grieves and the Darlington Ordinariate Group made me feel very welcome and it was amazing to witness the Anglican patrimony made real among the Group’s members. It was a wonderful experience to see priest and people working so hard to make the Ordinariate a reality in County Durham and North Yorkshire.” He added, “The Darlington Group is also extremely organised and self-sufficient, has a fantastic music programme, a full professional choir, and meets in a lovely old church in the village of Gainford, Co Durham. They cover their priest’s stipend and also support local events and charities. They host fundraising events, which are also ‘village events’, every other week or so, and Fr Grieves is very much seen as the local parish priest for the whole of Gainford.” Speaking of the Sunday morning Ordinariate Mass, he said: “The liturgy was superb, the choir amazing, and very ‘Anglican’ – lots of beautiful hymns and a whole Anglo-Catholic atmosphere. Truly wonderful!”

Earlier in the week, members of the Group held a Lenten lunch and raised £150 for the Friends of the Ordinariate, which Fr Grieves handed to Dylan after Mass. The weekend visit ended with lunch at a local Tea Room, called Howeys, which was hosted by members of the Group.

A full report on the visit will appear in the next issue of the Friends of the Ordinariate newsletter, which will be published in Eastertide.

More photos on the FOTO Flickr page and the Darlington Ordinariate website.

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St Gianna Oratory in Tucson, Arizona

P1030985Over the weekend of 29/30 March, the Chairman of the Friends of the Ordinariate, Nicolas Ollivant, was in Tucson, Arizona, visiting old friends. On the recommendation of a member of the parish of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick St, London, he attended Mass at St Gianna Oratory in Tucson. Since 2010, the church has been run by the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest. The parish priest is the Revd Canon Richard von Menshengen.

Following his visit, Nicolas said: “It was a beautiful spring day in Tucson with a temperature of about 80F/27C and the church, located on West University Boulevard, looked lovely. I was warmly welcomed and much enjoyed my visit. Any member of the Ordinariate who happens to be in Tucson should make an effort to visit this church as there is no church run by the Ordinariate of the Chair of St Peter in Tucson.”

Please follow this link for more on St Gianna’s church in Tucson.

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March and April Music List for Warwick Street

Please find below a link to the March and April 2014 Music List for the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street — the Personal Ordinariate’s Central Church. The list includes music for all choral services at Warwick Street for the remaining part of Lent, for Holy Week and also for Easter up to Low Sunday.

Warwick Street Music list March and April 2014

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Ash Wednesday at Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory

The Church of Our lady of the Assumption & St Gregory

The Church of Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory

When Cardinal Müller, the Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, met the ordinaries of the personal ordinariates from Australia, the UK and the USA in Rome last week he spoke about the importance of sacred liturgy as an expression of communion. He said that the ordinaries’ role in this regard was critical: “By ensuring that the sacred liturgy is celebrated worthily and well, you further the communion of the Church by drawing people into the worship of God who is communio“. He added that the sacred liturgy was also the “privileged place” for encountering Anglican patrimony, which is how ordinariate parishes and communities distinguish themselves, bearing witness to the Faith in the diversity of its expression.

Having returned to London after his visit to the Apostolic See, the Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, Mgr Keith Newton, gave an example of the worthy celebration of the sacred liturgy, which included Anglican patrimony, when he celebrated the Ash Wednesday Solemn Mass at the Ordinariate Central Church – Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street, London W1 – on Wednesday 5 March. The liturgy was accompanied by the following  music:

Plainsong Lent Prose Mode V
William Byrd Mass for Five Voices
Samuel Sebastian Wesley Wash me Throughly
Gregorio Allegri Miserere

The choir was conducted by Keith Brown and the organist was Jonathan Kingston.

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Cardinal Nichols Celebrates a Mass of Thanksgiving

©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

©Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

The newly created Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster and President of the Bishops’ Conference of England & Wales, celebrated a Mass of Thanksgiving in Westminster Cathedral on Sunday 2 March. The Apostolic Nuncio, HE Archbishop Antonio Mennini, along with many bishops and priests of England and Wales, joined the Cardinal in the sanctuary.

Among the priests who concelebrated the Mass was Fr Anthony Watkins of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. Fr Watkins is attached to Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory’s Church, Warwick Street – the central London church given into the care of the Ordinariate in 2013 by the new Cardinal Nichols.

The Friends of the Ordinariate were also represented at the Mass by the Chairman, Nicolas Ollivant. In conversation after the Mass, the Apostolic Nuncio told Nicolas that he was very much looking forward to celebrating the Ordinariate’s Chrism Mass in Warwick Street on Monday 14 April.

The Mass was offered to give thanks for the creation of 19 new cardinals at the ordinary public Consistory in Rome on Saturday 22 February. The Friends of the Ordinariate wish to join the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham in congratulating Cardinal Nichols on his elevation.

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The UK Ordinariate Three Years Later: A Snapshot

By Joanna Bogle, DSG

[From The Catholic World Report]

“Auntie Joanna, can I help you with your knitting?”

The difference between tapestry and knitting was not apparent to an uninitiated small boy, fascinated by the intricacies of bright wool and needles. Not one to discourage youthful enthusiasm, I gingerly showed my young nephew how to insert the wool through the mesh with the special blunt-ended needle, and with deep breaths of satisfaction he produced some creditable stitches. His contribution to the kneeler for St. Anselm’s, Pembury was small, but in a way he was helping to make history.

There are a great many magnificent and ancient churches in England, but St Anselm’s is not one of them. It’s a smallish, bleak hall, standing on a green rising up from the main road in Pembury, a village near Tunbridge Wells in Kent. It has bare walls, plastic chairs, a cramped feel, and no external ornaments to indicate its sacred use. And it is rented out for much of the week for ballet classes and a children’s playgroup.

But the reason for its place in history is important. The hall is part of the Catholic parish of Tunbridge Wells. When Pope Benedict XVI created the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, an Anglican clergyman, the Rev. Ed Tomlinson—then vicar of a large Anglican church in Tunbridge Wells—responded with eagerness. Pope Benedict’s call, in his message Anglicanorum Coetibus—“to groups of Anglicans”—was an invitation to come into full communion with the Catholic Church, bringing along Anglican traditions, music, and what has been generally described as “Anglican patrimony.” …

To continue reading the article, please click HERE. (The article includes a reference to the Friends, who supported the project mention by Joanna Bogle.)

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Why did so many seek to revolutionize the Church in the 60s and 70s?

By Msgr Charles Pope

[From the Archdiocese of Washington’s blog]

In my college years, I worked with a company that built and serviced pipe organs around the Washington DC area. During those years I probably entered some 300 different churches both Catholic and Protestant.

Of course, as a Catholic, I particularly loved going to the Catholic churches. I especially loved visiting the older city parishes that were built back before the revolution. I had grown up in the suburbs where almost every church was built after 1955, when church building took a decided turn for the worse: Ugly bland, beige buildings with carpeted floors and potted plants. A plain wooden table and two candlesticks for the altar, almost no statues not even a crucifix, but that strange 70s invention known as the “resurrected Christ” was on the walls floating in midair with his hand extended. Maybe there was a cross behind him, maybe but he certainly wasn’t nailed to the cross. “We are resurrection people,” was inevitable response to those of us who wondered what ever happened to the very Catholic crucifix….

To read the article, please click HERE.

YouTube video used to illustrate the original article:

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Ordinariate Priest Composes New Mass Setting

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Fr Mark Elliot Smith (right) with Mgr Keith Newton (left). Photo: Ordinariate Flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/ukordinariate/sets/)

A new and highly adaptable setting of the Mass, composed by a priest of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, was performed for the first time on Sunday 9 February. The aptly named Mass of St Gregory was written by Fr Mark Elliott Smith and is set to the English translation of the Roman Missal. It was premiered at the 10.30am Sunday Mass in the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street (London, W1), where Fr Elliott Smith is the parish priest.

Fr Mark Elliot Smith accompanied the choir on the organ for the first performance of his Mass setting, while the choir was directed by Jonathan Kingston, Organist and Associate Director of Music at the church. Another Ordinariate priest, Fr Alan Griffin, celebrated the liturgy.

After Mass, members of the growing congregation at the church, which is dedicated to the life of the Personal Ordinariate, hailed the new setting of the Mass a great success.

Among those present for the Mass was Nicolas Ollivant, Chairman of the Friends of the Ordinariate. Reflecting on the Mass of St Gregory, he said: “It has a definitely Anglican tone to it and is suitable for congregational singing as well as for choirs.” He added: “There are very few settings of the Mass which are of any quality and which allow for the congregation to participate … this is a clear example of Anglican patrimony being brought into the Catholic Church.”

Jonathan Kingston commented: “New settings of the Mass can be viewed with some suspicion by church musicians. The market has a healthy supply of contemporary settings of the Mass, and some appear bland or without the challenges that musicians seek as the careful but sometimes perilous bridge between ‘music’ and ‘liturgy’ are negotiated. From even the first glance, however, it is clear that we have something altogether more individual and refreshing here, that seems to set it apart from others.”

He continued: “The words may be replaced by the text of the Ordinariate Use and the music is highly adaptable. It may be learned and used by a congregation responsible for one vocal line alone, or extended for four part choral harmony singing so that a choir may lead the worship. Fr Mark Elliot Smith’s setting strikes a rare blend: singable, natural, melodic lines so a congregation will not be bowled over by anything too demanding or vocally athletic, as well as instinctive and interesting harmonies to keep organists and choral part singers happy and challenged – involvement, therefore, for both parties. It is hoped that this new and inspiring setting will find a regular home at Warwick Street. One also hopes that the work may be published so that other churches may benefit from its creation.”

He added: “We are grateful to, and proud of, our Parish Priest for putting pen to manuscript and it was wonderful that he was at the organ to accompany its first performance.”

Fr Mark Elliott Smith’s Mass of St Gregory is set to become a popular setting of the Mass among Ordinariate churches and congregations, and may even find a place in diocesan Catholic parishes, helping to fulfil Benedict XVI’s vision for the Personal Ordinariate as a means of enriching the Roman Rite.

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Darlington Ordinariate Group: Future Events

The Darlington Ordinariate Group has some exciting events planned for the coming weeks, including a “Pie in the Sky” evening, a Solemn Mass for Ash Wednesday, Lenten devotions, and a full programme of music for Masses up until mid-May. To find our more, please visit the Darlington Ordinariate Group’s website.

The Darlington Ordinariate Group music list may be downloaded here (PDF)

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Confirmations at Precious Blood Church

precious 2The Ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, Mgr Keith Newton, will be administering the sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation at Precious Blood Church, London Bridge, on Sunday 9 February.

This is the first time that Confirmation has been administered since the parish came under the care of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. The candidates range in age from teens to adults. They have been preparing for the past several weeks, using the ANCHOR programme produced by the Dominican Sisters of St Joseph.

Please pray for the confirmands and their sponsors.

For more details, please see the Church of the Precious Blood’s website.

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A Mass where no one is in a hurry to leave

 

Dame Joanna Bogle says that if cradle Catholics attend ordinariate Masses they are likely to be surprised and delighted by what they find.

[From the Catholic Herald (31/01/14); reproduced by kind permission of Luke Coppen, Editor, and the author, Joanna Bogle DSG]

A city church: a mixed-race congregation, strong African voices among the grown-ups, sharp south London accents among the young. On weekdays, a good number of office workers for a lunchtime Mass that starts at 1:05. Trains roar past on the viaduct. Sometimes the electric flashes dart swiftly and fleetingly across the nave.

A city parish rather like any other – but this one, the Church of the Most Precious Blood at the Borough, London Bridge, has a particular flavour as it is in the care of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham. The flavour is subtle, but noticeable: a reference to “Keith, our Ordinary” along with “Francis our Pope and Peter our bishop” (we are in the Diocese of Southwark) and the singing is good. And the children – no references here to “parish catechetics” or “children’s liturgy group”, but a frankly named Sunday School, which they seem to enjoy, and which they attend by forming up into a procession led by one of their number bearing a (specially made and suitably sized) processional cross. At the end of Mass, no one hurries out. People remain. And we sing the Angelus, led by the rector and with the Sunday School children carolling back the responses in good voice from the front pews.

When the creation of the ordinariate was first announced my immediate thought was for the people I had come to know in the Forward in Faith movement in the Church of England. My links with them were not particularly close and focused chiefly on a monthly magazine for which I wrote from time to time and which I always read avidly, as it included insightful and often very funny pieces about politically correct absurdities infesting churchy bureaucracies. There were also good book reviews, and features exploring current issues, notably, of course, the whole women priests thing. The subtext of many of the features in the magazine was: “And can Rome hear us?”

Rome could indeed hear, and when Benedict XVI unveiled the Anglicanorum coetibus plan it was a plan that it had “made in Britain” stamped all through it. This was exactly the thing that had been discussed and hoped-for, mulled over, and prayed for by groups of Anglicans for some years past.

And now it’s being implemented. Not without hiccups. There is more than a hint that some – not all – of those in influential places in the Catholic Church in England and Wales are less than enthusiastic. There seems to be a longing for the 1970s, when “ecumenical dialogue” seemed exciting and involved pleasant talk via pleasant places with any destination a longish way off. Recognition of a new situation, of a new reality following the slamming of the door by the C of E in 1992 with the decision to create women priests, has been slow.

But so often things are slow. As the cliché puts it, “the Catholic Church thinks in centuries”. The ordinariate has had a smallish and gentle start. It has a central London church, at Warwick Street, and it has the church on the south bank of the Thames, at London Bridge. This is the one I sometimes now attend, and before you raise the matter – yes, I am a cradle Catholic, and the whole point of the ordinariate is that it is part of the Catholic Church and any Catholic can attend any ordinariate Mass, just as we can attend any other Catholic Mass of any group in full communion with Rome.

I admit to enjoying the novelty of the “Anglican patrimony”. There is an Ordinariate Rite Mass on Thursday evenings, preceded by Evensong. Phrases that I had only heard via old films or on occasional visits with friends echo agreeably: “We do not presume to come to this thy Table, O merciful Lord, trusting in our own righteousness, but in thy manifold and great mercies…” I like the idea of having churchwardens and there have been some glorious processions, of the kind that any Catholic parish could have and indeed are now beginning to have again.

But the patrimony is not a package deal. At St Anselm’s in Pembury, which serves Catholics in the village of Pembury in Kent and is home to the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham in the Tunbridge Wells area, there are plans to renovate and refurbish the hall that functions as a church, and I offered to help make some proper tapestry kneelers. We now have a project going and volunteers are stitching happily. But when I enthused about this at Precious Blood eyes rolled and there was great amusement. Apparently tapestry kneelers are soooo C of E country church and definitely not in the tradition that Precious Blood celebrates. Nuances here in the patrimony that I hadn’t known about…

Is the ordinariate a success? As another cliché goes, it’s too early to say. There will be more clergy and lay people coming in over the next years, though not in rushing torrents. There will be vigour and enthusiasm brought into the Catholic Church: zeal for evangelisation, dedication to good liturgy, traditions of music and preaching. We need to seize the opportunities that the ordinariate offers. More churches and parishes need to be offered to ordinariate groups. It is frankly dreadful to hear of a Catholic church being closed where there is an ordinariate priest and group of faithful ready and keen to take it on, and we need less nervousness about it all. And what of those Forward in Faith people with whom I was in contact over the years? Have they joined the ordinariate? Some: yes. Others: no. It is not for me to ask: “Why not?” But I do ask all the same. And the response varies from “My heart is really with the ordinariate, but…” followed by a tailing off into silence, to “I really want to – I’m thinking about it”. There will be some for whom there are doctrinal issues, and among these there is considerable integrity and some genuine anguish as they face the future. But others say that this is not really the issue.

So what is the issue? A fear that years of useful ministry may give way to being a marginalised group, a loss of a proper parish church and parish life. And there are less worthy things that also hold people back: “No longer good reasons – just excuses,” as one ordinariate priest put it. The Anglican Church can offer a good life: a lovely church, a pleasant vicarage, a reasonable income, and – at the higher level of the structure – considerable social status. The “Roman option” can’t offer these. But it can offer the priceless worth of union with the successor of St Peter, the absolute firmness of that rock, the breadth and width of a communion that enables a rich patrimony to flourish.

Dame Joanna Bogle is a writer and broadcaster. She blogs at Joannabogle.blogspot.com

[The original article may be read in the current issue of the Catholic Herald, available in print in churches, parishes and wholesale outlets, as well as online at Exact Editions. The Friends of the Ordinariate are grateful to Luke Coppen and Joanna Bogle for allowing us to reproduce the text of the article here.]

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St Agatha’s Festival — High Mass in the Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite

From the Isle of Wight and Portsmouth Ordinariate Group, based at St Agatha’s Portsmouth.

“St Agatha’s Festival — Saturday 8 February 2014, 11.00am — Solemn High Mass and Procession in honour of St Agatha, Virgin and Martyr (Mozart’s Credo Mass K257, with orchestra, sung by Newman Consort). Homily will be given by Dom Cuthbert OSB, Abbot of Farnborough Abbey. Reshments served afterwards. All welcome.”

StAgathas

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Pastor Iuventus on the Personal Ordinariate

We would like to thank Pastor Iuventus for his piece on the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, written after his attendance at year’s Epiphany Service in the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption & Saint Gregory, Warwick Street. The article appears in the current edition of the Catholic Herald. The Carol Service was organised by the Friends of the Ordinariate.

Pastor Iuventus Jan 17 2014

The image of the the original article is published here by kind permission of the Editor of the Catholic Herald. (Please click on the image for a larger version.)

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Solemn Evensong and Benediction for the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

At 4.00pm on Sunday 2 February, the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord (Candlemas), Solemn Evensong will be sung and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament will be given at the Church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick St (London, W1). All are most welcome!

Candlemas Poster

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Friends’ Sponsored Server Training

704801_251406118322690_1422312344_oOn Saturday 18 January, the Friends of the Ordinariate sponsored a server training session at the church of Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street, Soho. The training was the first such event for altar servers who have volunteered to help at the church.

The first part of the session, from 10.30am to 12.00pm, was for people who had little or no experience of serving at Mass. The second part, from 12.00pm to 1.00pm, was for experienced servers who are used to serving at either Novus Ordo or Extraordinary Form Masses, but who had no experience of the Ordinariate Use.

Following the completion of the training sessions, the volunteers along with Fr Mark Elliott Smith and Fr Anthony Watkins went to Brasserie Zedel for lunch.

Further such training sessions will be scheduled in the future when it is hoped that servers from other Ordinariate groups will come to be trained. These sessions will be advertised in advance.

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January Music List for Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory’s Church, Warwick Street (London, W1)

To read the Music List for Masses and Services during January (and Candlemas) at Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory’s Church, Warwick Street, please click on the link below. Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory’s Church has been dedicated to the life of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham by the Archbishop of Westminster and is the base for the Ordinary of the Ordinariate, Mgr Keith Newton.

UPDATE (20/01/14): Please note that Evensong and Benediction for Candlemas (2 February) will now begin at 4.00pm, not 6.00pm as advertised.

Warwick Street January Music List (PDF)

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First Ordinariate Monastery founded on New Year’s Day

[From the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham]

Mother Winsome with KN at reception Jan 1

On 1 January, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, the convent of the Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Oscott Hill, Birmingham, was filled with priests and lay members of the Ordinariate, local parishioners and friends, for the Mass at which the community of 10 Sisters was formally established as The Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham’s first autonomous monastery.

The Sisters, formerly members of an Anglican Community in Wantage, Oxfordshire, professed their solemn vows, each placing her hands into those of the Ordinary of the Ordinariate, Monsignor Keith Newton, who read the Decree of Erection, presided at the Mass and delivered the homily. The day was the first anniversary of the sisters’ reception into the full communion of the Catholic Church.

During his homily, Mgr Newton said that 1 January was an appropriate day to mark a new beginning, especially for a community under the maternal care of the Mother of God, who teaches us, he said, “uniquely, though simply and effectively, how to follow her son as his disciples”.

Quoting Pope Paul VI’s description of Our Lady as “the attentive virgin” whose certainty of faith flowed from her contemplative life, Mgr Newton said this was the vocation to which the sisters had been called. “Nobody can explain its value in the world’s terms but its power is immeasurable”. Mary, Mgr Newton said, taught us to ponder the divine mystery, to listen to God’s voice deep within us. Addressing the sisters directly, he went on: “For us, you will be the praying heart of the Ordinariate”.

Mgr Newton appointed Mother Winsome as the first Reverend Mother for an initial period of three years. Subsequent Reverend Mothers will be elected in accordance with the constitutions of the monastery.

Mother Winsome said: “For us the day was a mixture of great solemnity, but also of deep joy. We each professed our original vows separately, in the case of some of the sisters, more than 50 years ago. For us to be able to renew our vows solemnly and publicly and to be able to share this profound moment, when we have shared such a unique spiritual journey over the last two years, felt a very special gift of God to each of us and to us corporately as Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary”.

The Mass was followed by a reception for all in the Sisters’ Refectory.

To read Mgr Newton’s homily in full, please click HERE.

The photos below were also taken on the day:

Mother Winsome professes vows (witth Mgr KN)

2 sisters and congregation Jan 1

SBVM group photo Jan 1

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Ordinariate Use Solemn Mass of Christmas

These images were taken during the Solemn Mass of the Nativity of the Lord that was celebrated by Mgr Keith Newton at 9.00pm on 24 December in Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory’s Church, Warwick St (London). The Mass was offered according to the Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite.

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More available here

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 Ordinariate Use Christmas Masses

A list of places where Holy Mass will be offered according to the Ordinariate Use this Christmas has been published. The list is available on the Ordinariate website (please follow link here).

Times of Masses and the music for Christmas at Warwick Street are also available — the 9.00pm Solemn Mass on Christmas Eve will be celebrated according to the Ordinariate Use (see poster below).

We would like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very Merry and Holy Christmas.

Warwick St Christmas 2013 final (JPEG)

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The Advent edition of the Friends’ Newsletter 

The Advent Newsletter for the Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham has gone to print. To download the pdf version, please follow the link below.

The Newsletter contains news of Friends’ events, a focus on the Ordinariate in the South-West, and articles by contributors including Mgr Andrew Burnham and Fr Daniel Lloyd.

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To download the Advent Newsletter, please click here: Friends of the Ordinariate Advent Newsletter 2013

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The ordinariate liturgy is even more splendid in action than it seemed on the page

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Mgr Keith Newton celebrating the Ordinariate Use at Warwick Street,
10 October 2013

By William Oddie

(From the Catholic Herald)

One or two people have asked me how it went: the Oxford ordinariate’s first celebration of the newly authorised ordinariate liturgy, about which I wrote in this week’s print edition of the paper (my piece can be read online). [See below.]

Well, it was wonderful. The prayers translated by Cranmer from the Sarum liturgy, and even two long prayers actually composed by him, together with important elements of the old Anglo-Catholic English Missal (a Cranmerised version of the Tridentine Mass), all celebrated with great care and devotion, and beautifully sung by a small but expert choir (not a voice in it below professional standards), together with the choice of plainchant settings for introit, gradual and alleluias, and the actual Mass setting itself, was at times breathtakingly beautiful. And it wasn’t just a “sacred concert”, as I have heard High Masses elsewhere described: it was all wonderfully conducive to prayer; truly all celebrated to the glory of God.

It wasn’t all in English: the ordinary of the Mass was sung in Latin, but there’s nothing un-Anglican about that: go to most Anglican cathedrals with a good choir, and you will see that this is common: quite simply, if you’ve got good singers, you want good settings, and they’re nearly all in Latin. And this particular setting can certainly be described as part of the “Anglican patrimony” the ordinariate is bringing into the Catholic Church; it was by Parry, an Anglican composer par excellence, from whom it was commissioned for use in Westminster Cathedral….

 

(To read Dr Oddie’s blog post in full, please see the Catholic Herald website.)
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Darlington Ordinariate Group marks the end of the Year of Faith

OLW Christ the King Solemn Benediction (O Salutaris)

These photos were sent to the Friends of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham’s office by Fr Ian Grieves of the Darlington Ordinariate Group at St Osmund’s, Gainford, in the Tees Valley. They show how the Darlington Ordinariate Group celebrated the end to the Year of Faith and the Solemnity Christ the King with a Solemn Mass (Schubert’s Mass in G & Benjamin Britten’s Jubilate Deo in C), followed by drinks and parish luncheon for 97 group members in Gainford Village Hall. The luncheon was followed by Solemn Evensong & Benediction (Music my Sumsion, Mendelssohn, Elgar and Durufle). As Fr Grieves commented: “A superb day!”

OLW Christ the King Choir

OLW Christ the King Luncheon

More photos of the event are available on the Darlington Ordinariate Group’s website.

All photos: ©Mr A Gerrard of Darlington

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Ex-Anglicans break out of the ghetto

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By William Oddie

Recently it was, for various reasons, not possible for my wife and me to get to Mass on Sunday, so we looked around for a Saturday evening vigil Mass. Our nearest happened to be the weekly Sunday Mass of the Oxford area ordinariate.

We went to that. I had never attended an ordinariate Mass and was looking forward to experiencing the new ordinariate liturgy. I was therefore a little disappointed that, since the newly authorised liturgy was still being carefully rolled out, what was actually still being celebrated was the Novus Ordo in English. I sometimes have a certain sense of being flattened by this liturgy, even in the new translation. I know the Mass is the Mass; all the same, I am used to the Novus Ordo in the form of the Latin High Mass at the Oxford Oratory: enough said…

 

(To read the article in full, please visit the Catholic Herald website.)

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Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham at the 2013 Towards Advent Event

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On Saturday 23 November, the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham was represented with a stall at the Towards Advent festival of Catholic culture event in Westminster Cathedral Hall. The stall was looked after by members of LOGS – the Ladies Ordinariate Group. Members of LOGS are mainly taken from the South London and Croydon Ordinariate groups, with most members based at the Church of the Precious Blood in London Bridge. The parish priest of Precious Blood, Fr Christopher Pearson, was also present on the day.

For more information on LOGS, please see HERE.

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The London Oratory’s Christmas Carol Service

Carols Oratory

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What on Earth is this “Ordinariate”?

by Fr Keith Robinson, a priest of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham

photo1606It is not at all to be wondered at, that people generally have no real idea as to what the Ordinariate is, or what it is about. They have neither heard its history, nor had its intended purpose explained to them. For reasons which will be obvious, the preparation of it had to be shrouded in secrecy, and then it all happened so quickly that there really wasn’t time for an adequate explanation. Nor was it entirely clear who should, or even could explain it, apart from the Holy Father himself. There wasn’t even a Pastoral Letter about it from the Bishops’ Conference which, with hindsight, could have been a useful thing. Understanding depended almost entirely upon what you might, or might not have been able to pick up from the newspapers – which inevitably peddled their own sensationalist glosses! For example, one headline, “Vatican parks tanks on Rowan’s Lawn”1 will probably serve to indicate the level of media comprehension. Generally speaking, when the Ordinariate was announced, the Church of England was very grumpy about it2 (though that was not true of the Archbishop of Canterbury personally), and the Catholic Church in England seemed completely bemused. It seemed not to know quite what to do, with the response varying greatly from diocese to diocese.

Yet the story of the Ordinariate is an amazing story. It is an example of Pope Benedict XVI’s understanding of a very difficult situation and his imagination in addressing it. It also might even be one of Blessed John Henry Newman’s miracles! Certainly at some point in the future historians will record the history of the Ordinariate, but meanwhile this is intended to be a sort of interim account. So I want to tell the Story, as it were, and then quite briefly say something about how it is currently working out in practice….

To read Fr Keith Robinson’s scholarly and highly informative article in full, please click HERE — The article was first presented as a talk.

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The Introduction of the Ordinariate Use 

“New Mass… words by T. Cranmer”

This cartoon first appeared in the Catholic Herald and is reproduced here by kind permission of the Editor and Cartoonist.

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Links to related items from the press:

Catholic Herald

Christopher Howse (Telegraph)

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Sermon preached by the Rev Dr Alan Griffin at the church of

Our Lady of the Assumption and St Gregory, Warwick Street, Soho, London

on Sunday 27 October 2013

In the near future, the new Roman Rite Ordinariate Use approved for Masses celebrated by priests of the Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham will be regularly celebrated in this church. For those of us nourished in the Anglican tradition, much of it will be very familiar, coming as it does from Thomas Cranmer’s Book of Common Prayer. This use is an important fruit of Pope Benedict’s vision of the reconciliation of Anglicans with the Holy See which enables many Anglican traditions to be incorporated and valued within the Catholic Church as “gifts” and “treasures”. It is a noble vision – an acceptance by the Catholic Church that many aspects of post-reformation Church of England faith and practice can be legitimately integrated into the faith of the Catholic Church.This vision reaches out to all Anglicans, not just to Anglo-Catholics. Archbishop Cranmer was certainly no Anglo-Catholic nor, in fact, were Lancelot Andrewes, William Laud, Jeremy Taylor and a host of other great Anglican divines during the centuries of separation of the Church of England from the Holy See. But much of what they believed, taught and wrote is compatible with the Catholic faith and, by bringing Cranmer “on board”, as it were, a bridge is being built across the centuries to the middle of the sixteenth century. It is a generous and gracious reaching-out by the Holy See…

 

Full sermon available for download HERE

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A 1746 Map showing Warwick Street, London

This map dating from 1746 shows the site of what is now the Ordinary’s church, Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory’s, Warwick Street, when it was the chapel of the Portuguese Ambassador. Our Lady of the Assumption & St Gregory’s Church was dedicated to the life of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham by Archbishop Vincent Nichols earlier this year.

Warwick St map 1746

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Mozart’s Requiem 

Westminster Cathedral Choir

Wednesday 13 November

requiem

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